Monthly Archives: March 2012

Two summers back, comic fans of Bryan Lee O’Malley’s acclaimed Oni Press “Scott Pilgrim” graphic novels were invited to see the world of the books in blazing color when the “Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World” film hit the big screen. This August, that process comes full circle as the publisher prepares an all-new deluxe hardcover editions of the series with color by “Batman, Incorporated” and “Swamp Thing” colorist Nathan Fairbairn.

Oni and O’Malley jointly announced the new 6″ X 9″ volumes tonight at the Emerald City Comic Con, revealing that after the first book – “Scott Pilgrim’s Precious Little Life” – hits in August, the second color hardcover will land in October. Subsequent books in the series will come out bi-annually until readers can have the full “Scott Pilgrim” saga in color on their shelves by 2014. These new editions will also feature brand-new, DVD-style bonus features prepared by O’Malley.

Bryan, let’s talk about the origin of these new “Scott Pilgrim” editions. Had you been thinking about a color version of the series for a while, or is this a result of you having some room in your schedule before your new “Seconds” graphic novel comes out next year?

Bryan Lee O’Malley: It’s something we’ve talked about, and there are so many possibilities for repackaging. People are always asking, “Are you going to do a big omnibus edition?” and things like that. Initially, I was resistant to color because the books were always intended for black and white. That was part of the manga aesthetic I was going for. But we found the colorist Nathan Fairbairn who’s really good. He works on “Batman Inc.,” and he’s amazing. We actually had a few people try out, and he just nailed it. He sent pages in and said, “I didn’t have much time, so I just did these in an afternoon,” and they were great. That’s kind of what you need when you’re looking for someone to color 1,200 pages of comics – someone who’s really fast and has the right style off the bat. I was really, really impressed with that, and it made me much more enthusiastic for the process now. Then someone at Oni decided to make the books hardcovers at a larger trim size, so I think they’re going to be really cool.

And this isn’t just a simple coloring job. I know you’ve been working to clean up some of the art and prepare it for this whole process. Did you end up redrawing any of the pages, or did you go through and just clean up the lines a bit?

I didn’t do too much redrawing in the first book. There’s literally one page at the very end that I completely crapped out when I was in a super hurry to finish the book. So I went back and redrew four panels and turned them into six panels instead. I don’t know if anybody will really even notice that that’s different, but I did it. I didn’t want to go the George Lucas route and change everything, but in terms of cleaning up the art, when you’re going to have a guy color a bunch of pages you drew eight years ago, you kind of want to make sure he can understand what he’s looking at. [Laughs] I mean, when you’re doing a black and white book on a deadline, there’s a lot of times where you just crap out some of the background elements and stuff like that. You just scribble stick figures in the background. So there are some spots where I’ve tightened up things like that.

You’ve been answering a lot of questions and posting a lot of art on Tumblr of late, and I noticed one post where a fan was asking what color Ramona’s outfit was supposed to be in one of the books, and you said, “None. It was in black and white.” Are there instances now where you’re having to rethink how some of this stuff looks for the first time because of the colorization?

Yeah. That’s been hard, actually. We’re still going back and forth on some stuff as we’re not quite locked in on the first book. And I’ll say that since the movie came out, it’s kind of locked in a lot of these colors in people’s minds. So when we started working on this stuff, I felt that especially in the first book, we’re kind of beholden to the pallet of the movie. Fortunately, it’s this really nice, harmonious pallet. So in the first book, we know how pink the hair on Ramona is, and the outfits are all colored similarly, and I think we’ll just go from there. I think that’ll help me decide on the whole thing, and it’s already what’s in the reader’s mind at this point. It’d be weird to go and color things all different at this point.

 A sample of Nathan Fairbairn’s colors. See more below.

The other big part of this is some bonus features in each book. Like I said, you’ve been going through a lot of your old concept work and other sketches online of late. Has that just been part of the preparation for this project, or are you going through and scanning your old art in general to clear out all that paper from your life?

No, that’s is all just stuff that’s just been sitting on my hard drive. I’ve been all digital pretty much since the beginning of “Scott Pilgrim,” so most of that is me going through old folders on my computer to clean stuff up. The part of the book that we’re doing is kind of like a “DVD extras” section at the back. It’s turning out pretty cool. But otherwise, I’m just going through and picking out stuff on my computer that I haven’t looked at in years and putting it on my blog. The extras in the books are largely unpublished. There are a few pictures and sketchbook things I’ve published over the years, but a lot of it is new stuff, and there’s commentary on all of it. I wrote an essay on how I started the book, and that kind of thing will continue on all the new volumes.

What’s it been like to get back into all this art? I think people are excited to see “Seconds” as it’ll be the first long form non-Scott thing you’ve done in eight years or so, but has the coloring and remastering been cathartic at all? Are you going to do this and be ready to not draw any Scott Pilgrim for a few years?

Well, I’m going to be working on these reprints for the next two years probably. We’re doing two a year, and I’ve cleaned up the art on the first two volumes so far. I’ll have to do more as we get closer to each new one and I do the extras for them. So I’m really constantly revisiting, which is fun. Obviously, I’m self-obsessed and like doing this stuff. [Laughter]

“Seconds” comes out next year. Are you wrapped on that book or working on these two concurrently? Has there been any ways in which one project feeds off the other?

I’m nowhere near wrapped on “Seconds.” It’s set for next summer, but I’m still working on I guess what you’d call “pencils.” I work that phase on a computer now, so there’s really no penciling involved. But I don’t think there’s a lot of cross-polination. It’s been going pretty well. I’m trying to do all the covers for the “Scott Pilgrim” reprints at the beginning so they all look the same before I get into my “Seconds” style…whatever that ends up being. I find that my work always mutates from year-to-year. So I want them to all look the same when they come out.

Overall, after working on this with Nathan, do you think working in color is going to become a regular part of your comics moving forward, or will you stick to black and white for most things?

I think it’ll vary from project to project. The process of coloring can be incredibly expensive, and it wouldn’t have even been an option at the start of “Scott Pilgrim.” But it feels good as a project with a collaborator. I don’t think I’d ever want to color my own comics. It’s a lot of work. But Nathan’s been great, and I’d love to work with him on future stuff.

        
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New Superman Logo from “Man of Steel”

 

The official Facebook page for Man of Steel has gone live, providing a first look at the redesigned logo for director Zack Snyder’s reboot of the Warner Bros. franchise. It’s dark, textured and a little gritty, and likely to displease fans already grumbling about the updated costume.

Written by David S. Goyer from a story by Goyer and Christopher Nolan, Man of Steel stars Henry Cavill as Clark Kent, Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Michael Shannon as General Zod, Diane Lane as Martha Kent, Kevin Costner as Jonathan Kent, Russell Crowe as Jor-El, Ayelet Zurer as Lara Lor-Van, Laurence Fishburne as Perry White, Antje Traue as Faora, Harry Lennix as General Swanwick and Christopher Meloni as Col. Hardy. The film opens June 14, 2013.


Marvel Reports First-Day Sell Out for AVENGERS VS. X-MEN #0

 

Marvel announced Wednesday that Avengers vs. X-Men #0 has sold out at Diamond on its first day of release, potentially signaling similar news to come over the next few months during the course of the 12-part, biweekly event series.

 

As usual, a sell out at the distributor level means that copies may very well still be available on store shelves.

“Having Avengers VS. X-Men #0 sell out the same day the book goes on sale is phenomenal,” said Marvel editor-in-chief Axel Alonso in a statement. “The excitement level around this event has been monumental, and now fans can finally experience the story that we’ve been waiting years to tell.”


Tumblr Takes On: THE HUNGER GAMES

It seems as though the whole world saw The Hunger Games this past weekend. This week on Tumblr Takes On, we are showcasing everyone’s responses in memes and photoshopped goodness!


Back in Milpitas during the Estebar Reunion.

patricio el mahico

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The Walking Dead Showrunner GLEN MAZZARA Reveals Season Three & Four Details

source: http://www.dailyblam.com/news/2012/03/20/interview-the-walking-dead-showrunner-glen-mazzara-reveals-season-3-details-more

 

Spoiler Warning: Glen Mazzara, showrunner for AMC’s The Walking Dead revealed some vital information in regards to the upcoming season of the show and mentioned that he sees the upcoming Prison arc lasting for both seasons three and four. Plus, he offers comments on pacing complaints, character evolutions/intros, the TV series catching up to the source material and more.

The Walking Dead tells the story of the months and years after a zombie apocalypse, following a group of survivors who travel in search of a safe and secure home. The series goes on to explore the challenges of life in a world overrun by walkers, where the interpersonal conflicts often present a greater danger than anything else and over time, the characters grow willing to do almost anything to survive.

As next season of The Walking Dead gears up for shooting its 16 episode order this May, fans should prepare themselves to visit the next safe haven that comic readers know all too well. During a recent round table interview, Glen Mazzara mentioned that the aforementioned Prison arc will last all of the third season until the end of season four.

prison TWD.jpg

“I think that a lot of people felt the farm was claustrophobic and we don’t want the prison to be that way,” said Mazzara. “The prison arc is really the heart of Robert Kirkman’s work with The Walking Dead.”

He went on to say that he plans to move closer to the source material in some aspects, but that there will of course be deviations along the way. Perhaps the largest deviation in season two was the surprise exit of Dale and therefore the lost opportunity to explore his storylines moving forward. In regards to Dale and Andrea’s love relationship, Mazzara said the writers didn’t feel the need to pursue it at all. “I don’t feel the Dale/Andrea storyline is a loss. It was never really on the table.”

One of the more intriguing comic book storylines involves Dale and group of cannibal hunters, and that will apparently live on through a different character in the TV series. “Anybody can be cannibalized, so we still have that story in the pocket.” As new characters like Michonne and the villainous Governor are introduced, I asked Mazzara if the zombies will ever take a backseat for an eventual human threat and conflict.

“Zombies will never take a backseat. We will introduce a significant human threat but the zombies are fully integrated into this world and are part of the landscape. There could be times with no zombie action but we feel we don’t need to have a 1000 zombies on the show either.”

TWD rick lori.jpg

Mazzara also confirmed that viewers can expect more ‘hero zombies’ in season three, much like the one that finished Dale off and proving Mazzara’s “quality over quantity” theory in regards to the undead. I also asked if he feels the show will catch up to the source material now that the ratings have shown continued and growing success. “Maybe we will catch up eventually; I know that Robert has no plans to end the comic.”

One of the common complaints Mazzara and the Walking Dead team have faced is purported pacing issues, which many felt caused the show to run slower in the first half before picking up later on in the season. When asked if any viewer input had an impact on this pacing change Mazzara replied, “No. My inclination was always to ramp it up after the Sophia arc and we were already so well into production that would have been impossible anyway.” Another question was asked if Mazzara’s comment of the final three episodes being a benchmark for the pacing of season three was a stab at Frank Darabont’s earlier work in which he vacated the series as showrunner after the Sophia arc. “Not at all. Frank actually wondered earlier on if we had pacing issues at the beginning himself.”

In regards to the characters, Mazzara revealed that Lori’s reaction of anger upon hearing news of Rick murdering Shane was one of shock and disgust in herself. This scene puzzled some fans when Lori implied for Rick to “deal with” Shane earlier in the season. “Lori did not ask Rick to kill Shane. She’s a confused control freak. She’s horrified at Rick and herself for her own role in this and is dealing with self hatred. She is appropriately f***ed up.”

michonne tv.jpg

Another character that viewers wanted to see more from was T-Dog, who many felt was underutilized. Mazzara said he was surprised by this reaction and compared T-Dog to another character by the name of Ronnie from Mazzara’s writing days on The Shield. He did however admit that they might have went a bit far in ignoring him to some degree saying, “He has been off to the side and forgotten so we’re going to correct this now that he’s survived the finale and develop him from being a background character in significant ways.”

As for new characters, he went on to confirm the sword-wielding Michonne (Danai Gurira) will have a vital role and said that, although her surprise entrance in season two was very “theatrical”, he does want to ground that character and make her real and gritty. The Governor, played by David Morrissey, is a good friend of Andrew Lincoln (who plays Rick) in real life. Mazzara mentioned that although he was not familiar with Morrissey’s work, Lincoln’s praise along with Morrissey’s audition were perfect. The actor understood that the Governor’s essence is that of a true villain.

Other interesting notes include

  • Mazzara confirmed fan favorite Merle (Michael Rooker) is “on the horizon” for season three.
  • Greg Nicotero will shoot webisodes based on different characters sometime next month.
  • Horror novelist Stephen King will not direct an episode of the series as he was Darabont’s connection.
  • The bar shoot-out in the episode ‘Triggerfinger’ was inspired by a similar scene from HBO’s The Wire.
  • A writer from HBO’s The Sopranos has been added to the TWD team.
  • Security has been ramped up significantly to prevent leaks, which were a huge plague for season two.
  • Scripts for season three are being written simultaneously in a style that Frank Darabont introduced that he learned while working with George Lucas. Mazzara will write the third season premiere.
  • Despite the prison arc showcasing some of the darkest aspects of the series, Mazzara confirmed that there’s“no place they won’t go” in those terms although they may utilize off-screen effects in some situations.
  • Mazzara’s friend Kurt Sutter (creator of Sons of Anarchy) will likely have a zombie cameo next season while Mazzara plays a dead biker on SOA to seal the deal. “I love Kurt, so I might take him up on that offer.”

WHEN TWO TRIBES GO TO WAR: “AVX” – THE TELEPATHIC ADVANTAGE?

Imagine facing an enemy you couldn’t lie to; an enemy who knows exactly what you’re thinking and can also manipulate your thoughts. That’s what you’re up against when you confront the mutants of Marvel Comics’ X-Men, whose ranks include some of the most powerful telepaths in the world. Confronting daunting challenges is the precise reason the Avengers, another premier Marvel super team, came together in the first place, and this April that’s just what they’ll do as they take on the X-Men in a battle to decide how best to save Earth from the threat of the destructive cosmic entity known as the Phoenix.

That battle will be chronicled in “Avengers Vs. X-Men” a 12-issue miniseries by an all-star team of Marvel creators. In today’s edition of WHEN TWO TRIBES GO TO WAR, CBR’s in-depth look at “AvX,” we take a look at the X-Men’s seemingly telepathic advantage over the Avengers. What are the X-Men’s telepaths capable of? What kind of strategic advantage do they give the X-Men leader, Cyclops? And how will the Avengers work around and fight back against the mental might of their adversaries? Helping us answer these questions and more are Senior Editor Nick Lowe who’s in charge of the X-Titles, and Senior Vice President of Publishing and Executive Editor Tom Brevoortwhose office oversees the Avengers titles.

Because we can read your minds, we know that are some of you who are just joining us. In that case, welcome! Feel free to get caught up on our previous installments where we look at the role team loyalties will play in “AvX,” the conflict’s four “generals,” and the “heavy artillery” members of the X-Men and the Avengers.

Tom Brevoort: The Avengers have had a few over the years, characters such as Moondragon — but telepathy really hasn’t been a regular part of their arsenal. As for the X-side, I think that comes from two interconnected things: Jean Grey and her status as not only a founding X-Man but as the lynchpin of probably the book’s best-remembered storyline, and the fact that Chris Claremont was a heavy SF reader during a period where numerous authors were exploring the idea of telepathic and telekinetic powers and how they might plausibly work within a SF context. Chris adapted, adopted and improved on a number of those ideas as he wrote “Uncanny X-Men.”

With mind-controlling mutants like Emma Frost on their side, will the X-Men have an advantage in “AvX?”

Nick Lowe: Let’s read between the lines, here. It’s because the X-Men are the best.

Telepathy in its most basic form is the power to send and receive thoughts, which is a useful communication tool with a number of strategic uses in battle. What kind of advantage does it give Cyclops and other characters in terms of communication and coordinating troop movements?

Lowe: It certainly doesn’t hurt. Cap and the Avengers know going in that the X-Men have this advantage, so you’ve got to think they’ve got some defensive planning in place to keep Emma from just shutting their brains down. And the coordination helps, but you have to remember how training centered Cyclops is. You can’t go more than an issue of X-Men back in the day without Cyclops drilling his team in the Danger Room and that hasn’t changed. He’s always training his crews and they operate like well oiled machines. No one does as much teamwork as the X-Men (heck they have well-known moves like the fastball special).

Telepathy also allows a person to reads the thoughts of others, which makes it a useful to gather intelligence. Of course, many mutants have a personal code that keeps them from reading the thoughts of others. How would a conflict like “AvX” affect that code? Are there some heroes that won’t have qualms about reading the thoughts of Avengers once things heat up and get tough?

Brevoort: I think it depends entirely on the individual character. My expectation is that the Avengers and the X-Men both are going to comport themselves as heroes, no differently than they’ve ever done. That said; the stakes they’re fighting for are so important that they will push our heroes to the wall in terms of what they will and will not do. And certainly some of the X-telepaths have used situational ethics to guide their actions in the past. Of course, keep in mind that Tony Stark has a lot of experience in building tech to protect himself from telepathic intrusions or attacks.

Lowe: Tom is right (yeesh that felt weird coming out of my mouth) about how the X-Men are going to behave. They’re still heroes. And like I said before, Cap would have to be an idiot not to have something in place to defend his team from this on some level. And he’s no idiot.

Powerful telepaths have another morally gray ability, the ability to erase and control minds. This begs the question, when things get tough will there be some X-Men tempted to use this ability? Or is this seen as a last ditch “nuclear option?”

Lowe: This would not be something Cyclops would be down with unless there were no other option and even then — but, and sorry to repeat again, the Avengers need to have some sort of plan for this.

Brevoort: Again, I wouldn’t think this would be an easily-used option if it were ever seriously considered at all. The X-Men haven’t done this sort of thing even to their most ruthless foes, so I don’t think they’d be inclined to do it to guys they know are heroes but whom they happen to be in contention with.

We’ve talked a bit about how effective an ability telepathy is in general, so let’s switch gears a little bit and talk about how effective it is against the Avengers in particular. Are there any Avengers who have a natural immunity to telepathic and psionic powers?

Brevoort: Iron Man’s armor has been proofed against telepathic attacks in the past. The Vision’s android mind is such that it’s anybody’s guess whether a telepathic strike would do him any harm. A telepathic attack on the Red Hulk is likely to just make him angrier and more savage, so if it didn’t immediately take him down it would likely make things worse. There are a few other examples, but they’re mostly the exceptions — for the most part the Avengers are no more protected from a telepathic assault than anyone else would be.

How aware are the Avengers in general of the strategic applications of telepathy? Can we assume that leaders like Captain America are aware of what telepaths can do and are ready and able to work around them?

Brevoort: I’d say it’s a certainty — especially since there are present and former X-Men among the Avengers’ ranks, who would be likely to disclose that information even if Cap wasn’t already aware of it.

Lowe: They definitely know it.

The X-Men may have an advantage in the area of mental powers, but the Avengers have three of the greatest scientific minds on the planet in Tony Stark, T’Challa, and Hank Pym. How easy would it be for these guys to whip up something that makes them and their team mates resistant to telepathic powers?

Brevoort: Given that we’ve seen Tony at least do this before in the past, I’d say it’d be relatively easy. Doesn’t mean that it’ll work, though, or be 100% proof against a determined X-Man digging down deep and fighting for a legitimate cause.

Lowe: It’s not going to really matter in the end as the X-Men are far superior in every way.